Maine Food Truck Insurance

Food trucks have roamed the streets of Portland Maine for several years.  Now they’re popping up in places from Biddeford Saco to Westbrook, Scarborough to Freeport, Sugarloaf to Sunday River. Food truck insurance can be a challenge for an inexperienced insurance agent. Insurance companies know how to insure trucks. They know how to insure restaurants. But rolling restaurants are different.

5 Types of Insurance Every Food Truck Needs

  • General Liability  Insurance – if someone breaks a tooth in a crabmeat roll or gets food poisoning after eating your product, they’re going to come back to you. GL coverage pays for these claims, as well as slips and falls and other injuries or damage that occur at your location.
  • Business Auto Insurance – If you get in an accident while you’re on the move, you need to have your food truck fixed and back online soon. If you’re at fault, you’ll also need protection to pay for the damage and injury you cause.
  • Workers Compensation Insurance – By law, you’re required to provide Maine workers comp coverage for your employees. If they’re injured at work or miss time due to an on-the-job injury or illness, workers compensation insurance pays them.
  • Property Insurance – You have a big investment in your inventory, fixtures and supplies, both at the commissary and on your food truck. Insurance can protect that asset against fire, theft, equipment breakdown and more.
  • Loss Of Income – If your food truck is down, you have no income.  What if your fryer malfunctions, causing a fire? You could be off the road for the whole summer season. Or what if your best brewery location or outdoor venue suddenly shuts down due to a fire, windstorm or some other disaster? Business income insurance for food trucks can help you replace the income you lose following property losses like these.

If you have questions about insuring a food truck in Maine, contact a Noyes Hall & Allen insurancce agent in South Portland at 207-799-5541, or click “get a quote” above. We’ve insured food trucks since they first came to Maine. We offer a choice of Maine’s preferred insurance companies, including Acadia Insurance’s Acadia Street Eats food truck program. We’ll help you find an insurance solution that fits your business and your budget. We’re independent and committed to you.

Does Homeowners Insurance Cover Solar Panels in Maine?

More Maine homeowners are installing solar panels. Roof-mounted solar PV panels promise many benefits: decreased electric bills; energy independence; and a reduced carbon footprint.

 

Are Solar Panels Automatically Covered by Maine Home Insurance?

The good news: your homeowners policy covers your home’s utility fixtures, including heating and electrical systems. Damage caused by fire, wind, falling trees and lightning are all covered.

The bad news: your homeowners policy excludes coverage for some common causes of loss (perils). If squirrels or birds damage your unit, your insurance won’t pay to fix it. And, if your PV solar panels simply stop working, you’re out of luck if you have an “off the shelf” homeowners policy.

Can I Buy Special Insurance for Solar Panels?

Some insurance companies offer breakdown coverage. This covers failure of home systems such as: boilers and heat pumps; appliances; electrical panels – and solar panels. If a system fails prematurely, your insurance company will pay to replace it. But beware: if your system rusts out or simply wears out at the end of its useful life, that’s not covered.  And deductibles apply: $500 and $1000 are common.

How Expensive is Solar Panel Insurance in Maine?

Home systems breakdown insurance doesn’t cost much, even though it insures your expensive solar panel installation. It usually costs less than $50 per year, added right onto your homeowners policy.

Do you live in the Portland Maine area? Looking for solar panel insurance or equipment breakdown coverage? Call Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance at 207-799-5541. We offer a choice of Maine’s top insurance companies. Several of them offer this special insurance. We can help you find the best fit for your budget and your home. We’re independent and committed to you.

Maine Drone Insurance

Maine businesses are using drones to create unique video, capture aerial shots, and check locations that would otherwise be hazardous or difficult to access. Photographers and videographers capture unique images and videos. Marketers use drones to create compelling and  content. Real estate agents and developers use drones to show the attractiveness and potential of properties.

New Drone Insurance Program in Maine

Acadia Insurance Drone coverageWe were excited to learn today about Acadia Insurance‘s new drone insurance program.  Until today, our clients have had to insure their drones in Maine with specialty insurance programs. That meant separate billing, coverage and claims. Sometimes, it’s even meant that they had to work directly with the insurance company, with no agent to help. Insurance company financial stability isn’t a given for these programs.

The Acadia program allows Maine businesses to insure their drone with the rest of their property and liability. One bill, one claim adjuster, one agent. Acadia is based in Westbrook, Maine and already insures thousands of Maine businesses. They’ve introduced special programs inspired by iconic and growing Maine businesses, from breweries to artisans and contractors.


related post: Are Drones Covered by Maine Homeowners or Business Insurance?


Do you use a drone in your Maine business? Have you bought insurance from a specialty program or an insurance company you’ve never heard of? Do you wonder if they’ll be able to pay claims? Do you struggle to speak to a human at your insurance company? Call a Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance agent in South Portland at 207-799-5541. We’re eager to see if Acadia Insurance can help Maine businesses insure their drones with a Maine insurance company.

Are Drones Covered by Maine Homeowners or Business Insurance?

Flying Drone

Innovative Maine businesses use drones to literally get a new perspective on their operations.  Land owners survey lots and buildings. Engineers use photos from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in project work.  Photographers and videographers use drones to capture unique images and videos. Marketers use or hire them to create compelling and disruptive visual content. Even individual hobby fliers own drones now.

 

 

Drones: A Money Saving Investment

High quality drones and UAVs are not cheap. It’s easy to invest $15,000 or more in a good quality industrial setup, including cameras and software. Still, that can be a lot less expensive than renting an airplane or helicopter, and offers much more control and flexibility. It’s also safer than sending an employee up on a ladder or bucket to inspect facilities at height. The price of hobby drones has dropped a lot in the last few years. You can find them for less than $1500.

Legal Issues for Drones in Maine

The FAA requires registration of drones and UAVs weighing more than 0.55 lbs. The maximum weight permitted is 55 lbs. Permitted location and other rules vary between pleasure and business use. A remote pilot airman certificate is required as well.

Drone owners and operators face many of the same liability issues as other aircraft pilots. The low altitude operation of UAVs can also create privacy and property issues. Some examples:

  • Injuring someone, either directly, or by causing an auto accident
  • Damaging property by striking it
  • Invasion of privacy or trespass

Even if a claim against you is not valid, defending yourself can cost many thousands of dollars in legal fees in Maine.

Drones are NOT Covered by Standard Insurance Policies

Because drones are considered unmanned aircraft, and subject to FAA regulation, they are excluded from coverage on homeowners or business liability policies. The Maine Bureau of Insurance recommends that you buy separate insurance for your drone. We agree.

Up to now, few insurers have offered insurance on drones. One of our company partners, Acadia Insurance recently introduced a liability insurance plan for businesses that use drones as an incidental part of their ordinary operations.

If you or your Maine business uses a drone or other UAV, contact a Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance agent in South Portland at 207.799.5541. We’d love to hear how you’re using this innovative technology for fun or business. We can help you manage your risk. We’re independent and committed to you.

Portland, Maine: Green Living in a Small City

 

The news is out: Portland, Maine (pop. 66,000) is a hot little city. Big city dwellers move here for the walkable, livable scale and good schools. Small town folks are attracted by our density of entertainment options, from music clubs to minor league sports. Outdoor lovers can ski, boat, hit the beach, climb a mountain, or kayak to an island, all within an hour of downtown Portland. Of course, our foodie and beer culture are well-known, for good reason.

Perhaps the thing that ties it all together is Portland’s green sensibility. Residents appreciate the natural beauty and resources of Southern Maine and Casco Bay. We celebrate and protect it. We put our money and volunteer hours into it. Many of us incorporate green living into our lifestyle.

Here are a few things that make Portland a green little city:

Portland’s Farm-to-Table Game is Strong

Most surrounding towns have weekly farmers markets. Portland Farmers’ Market sets up shop seasonally on Saturdays in Deering Oaks and Wednesdays in Monument Square – the heart of downtown Portland. There’s also a winter market. Portlanders like to eat fresh local food, whether at home or dining out.
Portland’s world-class restaurants and grocers celebrate fresh seafood and locally grown produce and meat. We even have potato donuts. Forbes says Portland ranks #1 in the U.S.  for microbreweries per capita. Many more breweries dot the region just outside the city.  The New York Times documented Portland’s locavore culture. But the secret was out long before that.


We Buy Local

The cool kids in Greater Portland support local merchants and locally-owned business. Sure, we have our share of big box retailers and chain restaurants near the highway. But as you wander the neighborhoods of Portland, you’re struck by the lack of homogeneous “I could be anywhere” sprawl. Even our downtown buildings advertise names recognized here, but not everywhere.
Popular business groups like Portland Buy LocalSouth Portland Cape Elizabeth Buy Local and the Portland Downtown District lead the charge of local business owners. In addition to the usual supermarket chains, Portland has many produce stores, butcher shops, fish mongers and bakeries. Ethnic markets and bodegas offer Asian, Halal, and Central American specialties.

Portland’s Green Non-Profits and Government Cooperate

Non-profits like Portland Trails (70 miles of nature trails in the city), Maine Island Trail Association (America’s first water trail, linking 200 islands), Bicycle Coalition of Maine and Friends of Casco Bay are well-connected to city and regional governments. Organizations like Cape Elizabeth Land Trust work to protect and preserve wild spaces. We have an award-winning private community composting service, Garbage to Garden. Portlanders even discuss green living over beer every month at Portland Greendrinks.
Government is committed to being green, too. Bike corrals and bike lanes are visible and growing on city streets. Both Portland and South Portland have sustainability coordinators on staff. Both cities are converting landfills to solar farms. The City of South Portland has a small fleet of electric cars. Portland’s Metro buses run on natural gas and have bike racks. Hadlock Field, where the Portland Sea Dogs play baseball, has convenient bike racks, and is right on the bus line.


In Portland It’s Easy Being Green

Most of Portland’s business, dining and entertainment is on the downtown peninsula, 2 miles long and 1 mile wide. That makes it easy for downtown dwellers to leave the car at home and walk or bike (albeit with a few hills). It’s easy to walk from work to dinner to a show without breaking a sweat (thank you, Casco Bay breezes!). Even our finest restaurants and theatres are quite casual; you’ll fit right in with your sensible shoes and outerwear.

Buses, car-shares and taxis cover the city effectively. High school students ride the Metro Bus to school, allowing some families to avoid getting a separate vehicle. Portland’s neighborhood elementary schools are within walking distance for most students.

It’s even easy to get out of Portland without a car. Our airport (PWM) is 4 miles from Monument Square (30 min./ Metro, 12 min. / taxi). Concord Trailways and Amtrak offer several trips daily to Boston. Concord also operates 2 trips a day to midtown Manhattan. Both leave from the Portland Transportation Center, 2 miles from the city center.

 

If you’re looking to live in a city big enough to keep you entertained (and employed) and small enough to live a low-impact lifestyle, it’s tough to find a better place than Portland, Maine.

What’s Causing U.S. Auto Insurance Rates to Go Up?

 

U.S. auto insurance rates increased 7.5% between January 2016 and January 2017. That’s after more than a 5% increase in 2006. What’s driving the increasing cost of car insurance? More accidents? More highway deaths? We hear about 4 major factors combining to make the cost of car insurance go up even faster than overall inflation.

auto & home insurance inflation

Medical and Labor Costs

Insurance pays for two big expenses: auto repairs and medical expenses.  Medical expense prices increased about 32% in the 8 years between 2005 and 2013. Auto repair labor costs have increased too. Also, it costs more to fix a newer car than an older one (see #3 below).

More Crowded Roads

Even if you aren’t driving more miles, your neighbors are. It’s not your imagination: the roads are more crowded. More cars on the road means an increased chance of a crash. Americans drove more that 3 trillion miles in 2015, a 3.5% increase from 2014. That’s the largest annual increase in 25 years. Why? Economists say an improving economy and low gas prices were the main reasons.

Lots of Newer, Hi-Tech Vehicles

Car makers are selling lots of vehicles. And many of them are computers on wheels. Americans bought 17.5 million new vehicles in 2015, a 5.7% increase from 2014. Newer cars cost more to fix than older ones. They also have advanced tech features. Rear bumper cameras are very common now. Front bumper radar and other safety features are available on many models. Even a side mirror likely has “blind spot warning” hardware. If you do get in an crash, chances are the insurance company will have to pay more to fix the other car than it would have a few years ago.

Distracted Driving

You may be the same safe driver you’ve always been. Unfortunately, many others on the road aren’t paying as much attention. A 2013 AAA study found that 2 out of 3 drivers reported using a mobile phone while driving. More than 25% admitted sending a text or email while behind the wheel. The National Safety Council estimates 26% of all car crashes involve cell phone use. Distracted driving increases the risk of a crash as much as driving drunk.


Related Post: Why Did My Maine Auto Insurance Go Up?


Should You Shop Your Maine Car Insurance?

Maybe. Every insurance company files their own rates based upon their experience and appetite. If your insurer had lots of claims in another part of the country, it could be affecting your rates. If you live in Southern Maine, contact a Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance agent for a review at 207-799-5541. We represent many different insurers, so you can compare with one phone call.

Not ready to talk to a human yet? You can still compare prices from up to 6 Maine auto insurance companies online on our web site.

When you chat with us, we can provide personalized, custom, professional advice. As a Trusted Choice insurance agent, we are independent and committed to you.

Maine Auto Insurance: What to Expect in 2017

maine-auto-insurance2017

Last Thursday, we met with executives from 7 different insurance companies, one after the other. Every December, we invite our key company partners to review the year and plan for the next.

It’s a full day spent discussing trends, challenges and opportunities in the insurance industry. We learn a lot from the executives’ lofty perspective. They learn just as much from our “front line” reports. By the end of the day, trends usually emerge.

This year, increasing frequency and cost of auto claims concerns almost every executive. Their companies are paying claims faster than they’re collecting premiums. They can’t afford to do that for long. We haven’t seen this trend yet in our agency’s fairly small sample of Maine’s drivers. But it’s clear: we should prepare for rising auto insurance rates in the next few years.

Four Reasons to Expect Higher Auto Insurance Rates in 2017

  1. Fierce Competition Depressed Car Insurance Rates

The Great Recession put extreme pressure on many household budgets. Many insurers focused their advertising message on reducing prices. GEICO spent more than $1 billion a year on advertising. State Farm spent about $800 million. This extreme competition caused prices to remain level for years. Total industry premiums remained flat from 2006 to 2009.

2. People Are Driving Again

While the economy was slow, driving decreased. Americans drove fewer miles 3 out of 4 years from 2008 to 2011, due to:

  • higher gas prices
  • higher unemployment
  • many younger people choosing to delay getting licensed

As the economy improved and gas prices dropped, Americans drove more. We now drive about 3.15 trillion miles per year, an increase of about 150 million miles since 2013.

3. Distracted Driving is a Big Bummer

Several execs shared their front-line adjusters’ stories about distracted driver crashes. Maine adjusters report that many claims involve drivers using mobile devices to text, talk or use social media. Keep in mind that all three are illegal in Maine.

National data reinforces these stories. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reported 431,000 people injured in distracted driving accidents in 2014, the latest year available. More than 3,000 people were killed. And that was 2 years before Pokemon Go.

4. Crashes Are On the Rise

With the increases in mileage driven and distracted driving, you might expect crash rates to spike. They have. Personal auto insurance claims in the U.S. increased 37.1% between 2006 and 2015. Meanwhile, auto insurance premiums increased 20.9%.

Higher speed limits, increased road congestion and distracted driving seem to be causing increased crash activity. A December 1 Portland Press Herald article cited a 32% increase in accidents on Route 295 north of Portland between 2013 and 2015.

What You Can Do to Control Auto Insurance Expenses

  • Shop Around – Compare prices every 3-5 years, or if your rates change significantly. Independent agencies like Noyes Hall & Allen represent several insurers. We can compare coverage and prices for you, without changing agents.
  • Bundle Property & Auto Insurance – Many insurers discount your auto policy if they insure your home, condo or apartment, too.
  • Think About Dropping Physical Damage Coverage – One rule of thumb is: if you’re spending more than 10% of the book value of your car on your comprehensive and collision insurance, consider dropping or adjusting your coverage.

    Related: When Should I Drop Collision Coverage?


  • Consider Usage-Based Insurance – UBI involves installing a telematics device in your vehicle. This allows your insurer to track your mileage and driving behavior. Many insurers offer big discounts if you allow them to customize your premium to your driving habits.

    Related: Is Progressive Snapshot Right for You? 5 Questions to Ask


  • Protect Your Credit Score – Almost every insurer uses an “insurance score” to price your insurance. These scores are closely related to your credit score. The better your credit score, the lower your auto insurance rate.

FMI:

More Accidents, Larger Claims Drive Costs Higher, Insurance Information Institute, October 2016 (.pdf)

Consumer Information, Maine Bureau of Insurance

Get Free Maine Auto Insurance Quotes in 10 Minutes, Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance

Rideshare Insurance for Uber & Lyft in Maine

 

Does Your Auto Insurance Protect You?

Many Maine drivers are thinking about making some extra cash by driving for rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft. They often ask us if how their personal auto insurance company would respond.

Personal Insurance Does NOT Cover Rideshare Driving

As soon as you turn on the app and make yourself available to pick up a guest, you turn OFF your Maine auto insurance policy – at least all of the policies we’re aware of. Your insurance company should deny any claim – collision, liability, uninsured motorist, medical payments, rental or towing – that occurred while you were available for hire or driving a customer.

Do Uber and Lyft Insurance Policies Protect Maine Drivers?

Knowing that personal insurance policies do not cover livery (driving for a fee), rideshare companies have obtained blanket insurance policies to cover their drivers. Most companies seem to be insured with James River Insurance, based in Richmond, VA, and rated A- by A.M. Best. These policies cover you pretty well when you’re carrying a customer – but not when you’re simply available and waiting for a customer request. This chart shows when coverage applies, and how much.

RideShare Insurance in Maine

 

What are the Risks of Being an Uber Driver?

As you can see from the chart above, the insurance provided by Uber, Lyft and similar companies leave important gaps that could cost you a lot – especially in Period One, when you have the app on and are awaiting a ride request.

DURING “PERIOD ONE”:

  • Injury from an uninsured or under-insured driver. If you are waiting for a ride request and someone rear-ends you at a stop light, their liability insurance should pay for the damage to your car, and your medical bills and lost wages. But, what if they have no insurance – or not enough? Uber and Lyft policies do not pay anything to repair your car. And, because their uninsured motorist coverage drops to state minimum limits during that time, you would have little or no coverage for your medical bills.
  • Liability to Others for Injury or Property Damage. Imagine you’re waiting for a ride request. You decide to stop for a coffee. When you pull in, you accidentally step on the gas instead of the brake, plowing into the front of the coffee shop. Your rideshare insurance will only cover state minimum liability limits for injuries to others or damage to property. Because your personal auto policy doesn’t cover you during this time, you’re out of luck if damages are higher. You’ll be responsible for paying for the damages. That could mean a lot of fares in your future just to repay the damage.
  • Damage to Your Car. Rideshare insurance policies don’t pay for damage to your car from crashes, vandalism, theft or fire. If you have a loan on your vehicle, you could find yourself making payments on a car you cannot drive. And you won’t be able to make more money via driving since your vehicle is out of commission.
  • Your Insurance Company Might Cancel Your Policy. Many drivers fail to notify their auto insurance company when they start to drive for a rideshare company. And for good reason: even  though they don’t cover your rideshare activities, insurance companies generally don’t like the idea. Your vehicle is on the road a lot more, possibly at odd hours and unfamiliar locations. Even if you’re driving a customer and have collision coverage under the Uber or Lyft insurance policy, they require you to first report it to your insurance company and be denied coverage. That can be an uncomfortable conversation, and it can attract the attention of the insurance company, which may then cancel your personal policy.

Know the Consequences Before You Become an Uber Driver in Maine

It’s tempting to make some extra money during your spare time. Just know that the opportunity comes with risks. Rideshare companies are eager to sign up new drivers, and may gloss over the risks and limitations of their insurance program. Make sure you understand them before you get behind the wheel for a rideshare company.

If you have questions about your Maine auto insurance, contact  Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance in South Portland at 207-799-5541. We’re independent and committed to you.

 

The Most Popular Vehicles in Portland Maine

 

As a Portland Maine insurance agent, we insure lots of homes, condos, vehicles and businesses. We thought it might be fun to share some facts about vehicles we insure. While our clients may not be a statistically accurate sample, we think they give a pretty good indication of what vehicles are most popular in the Portland Maine area. It’s also kind of interesting to see some trends by model year.

Top 10 Vehicle Brands in Portland Maine

If Noyes Hall & Allen Insurance clients currently are typical, the top 10 auto makers capture almost 75% of the market. The “big three” alone are 38%.

  1. TOYOTA – 15.2% market share
  2. FORD – 11.5%
  3. HONDA – 11.3%
  4. CHEVROLET – 9.1%
  5. SUBARU – 8.8%
  6. VOLVO – 4.0%
  7. NISSAN – 3.9%
  8. HYUNDAI – 3.4%
  9. VOLKSWAGEN – 3.3%
  10. JEEP – 3.3%

What are the Best-Selling Vehicles in Portland Maine?

This graphic shows which auto maker appears to have sold the most vehicles in each of the last 5 years, based on vehicles our clients own.

Favorite auto brands in Portland Maine

It’s interesting to note that Ford is the only auto maker always in the top 3. Toyota rode a wave of #1 but seems to be fading a bit. Subaru is off to a fast start with 2016 models. Will they sustain the momentum for the whole year?

How Long do Portland Maine People Keep their Vehicles?

The median model year of vehicles our clients own is 2008. So the average person keeps a car for about 8 years. Which side of average do you fall on?

0-4 YEARS OLD – 22.1%  (2013 to 2016 model year)
5-8 YEARS OLD – 30.1%  (2008 to 2012 model year)
8-12 YEARS OLD – 28.0% (2003 to 2007 model year)
Older than 12 YEARS – 15.8% (2002 model year and older).


 

When is the right time to drop collision coverage from your carClick on the link to read our blog post answering that question. 


The Most Popular Vehicle on the Road in Portland Maine

By IFCAR - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6770336
By IFCAR – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6770336

 

Despite being only the 5th most popular vehicle brand among our clients, Subaru has the top two models when you look at all vehicles on the road. The Subaru Outback is #1 by far, with the Subaru Forester #2. The Toyota Camry is right behind the Forester at #3. These top 3 vehicles represent more than 10% of the vehicles our clients own.

UPDATED: August 2017

The trends continue in 2017. Subaru seems to remain super popular in Portland Maine. Foreign models continue to dominate the top 5. So do 4X4 vehicles. Ford pickup sales appear to rise and fall, maybe with the economy or gas prices? The Nissan Rogue looked to be picking up steam in 2016, only to fall off the leader board in 2017.

 

Whatever you drive, if you live in the Portland Maine area and would like a review of your auto insurance, contact Noyes Hall & Allen at 207-799-5541. You can even get 7 Maine auto insurance quotes online in 10 minutes. Of course we also insure homes, condos, apartments, boats, motorcycles, businesses and more. We offer a choice from Maine’s preferred insurance companies. We’re independent and committed to you.

Uber Comes to Portland Maine: Are Uber Drivers Insured?

 

Rideshare service Uber began operating in Portland Maine at noon on October 2. Uber and its top competitor Lyft are innovative, efficient, popular – and controversial. uber screenshotEverywhere Uber and Lyft pop up, local lawmakers scramble to address it. Taxi operators and other livery drivers rail against it. And insurance companies caution drivers who might think about joining the Uber fleet.

Are Uber Drivers Insured?

If they have a personal auto policy, their own insurance will not cover them while they’re driving someone for a fee. Period. Every PAP excludes coverage while a vehicle is being used as a “public livery or conveyance“, which basically means driving others for hire. An Uber driver in an accident shouldn’t count on their personal insurance helping out.

You can’t blame insurance companies for that. If you’re driving for Uber, you’re probably driving more miles and hours than you otherwise would. You might be in areas unfamiliar to you, under time constraints, and at hours with higher congestion or impaired operators on the road. All of those increase the likelihood you could have an accident.

The Good News
Uber’s web site says that the service provides a commercial insurance policy with a $1 million limit per incident, including uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage. That’s more than 90% of drivers in Maine have. It also provides $50,000 of “contingent comprehensive and collision insurance”, which should pay for repairs to an Uber driver’s vehicle as a result of an accident during an Uber trip.

Not So Good News
Uber’s insurance drops to to $50,000 per person for bodily injury and $25,000 for property damage “between trips” – the absolute minimum limits allowed in Maine. That’s inadequate for most people who want to protect their assets or future earnings from an expensive lawsuit.

Uber says that most auto insurance policies will provide coverage during the time that the driver is logged on available for hire  but between trips. Talk is cheap. Don’t count on an insurance company seeing it the same way. When presented with a claim, expect an insurance company to say you were engaged in livery, just not actively driving someone – and deny your claim.

What Kind of Insurance Should an Uber Driver Have?
The only type guaranteed to cover you is a business auto policy, rated as livery use. If you insure your car with Maine commercial vehicle insurance  and are upfront about your Uber driving, you should be covered.

 Is Uber Rideshare Service Safe to Use?
If you’re thinking of taking a ride from Uber, you can expect that the driver has insurance while you’re in the vehicle. That includes if you’re hit by someone with no insurance. If you have a personal auto policy, you also have Medical Payments coverage (usually $5,000 or less) for minor medical expenses.

If you have questions about Portland Maine auto insurance or Maine business insurance, contact Noyes Hall & Allen at 207-799-5541. We’re independent and committed to you.